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Economic aid

The Danish state set up offices for special affairs on May 16, 1945. All Danes who had been persecuted during the occupation could apply for compensation and receive economic aid. These agencies were superseded by the law of compensation for the victims of the occupation of October 1, 1945. This law has since been revised several times, in part as a result of the growing recognition of the psychological consequences that violent experiences may entail.

When the offices were shut down in 1946, aid corresponding to 105 million of today's Danish crowns had been paid out to victims. 65% of the returned Jews received temporary help from the offices which amounted to close to one quarter of the total aid.

The yellowed papers
The yellowed papers

The central office for special affairs left behind a mountain of paper. These papers provide deep insight into the situation in which the returned Jews found themselves, as well as how complicated it is to administer public economic aid.

Børge Levy Andersen took up the struggle with the central office for special affairs.

No pay
No pay
Børge Levy Andersen documents that he has not been paid wages by his employer and therefore should not be excluded from receiving compensation.
Expenditures
Expenditures
Børge Levy Andersen sends in an account of the expenditures in connection with his flight to Sweden.
4000 crowns
4000 crowns
Notice of a grant to Børge Levy Andersen of 4000 crowns (corresponds to 48,000.00 Danish crowns today).

Space and spaciousness

- an exhibition about Jews in Denmark

The exhibition is a broad story of Jewish life in Denmark and focuses on co-exixstence and indentity through 400 years. Read more...

Openings hours

Summer (June-August):
Tuesday to Sunday: 10 am - 5 pm
Monday closed

Winter (September - May):
Tuesday-Friday: 1 pm - 4 pm
Saturday and Sunday: 12 noon - 5 pm
Monday closed