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(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).
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(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).

Agriculture apprentices

Danish immigration policies in the 1930s were highly restrictive towards German refugees. It is assessed that approximately 4,500 Jewish refugees passed through Denmark from 1933 to 1939. Temporary residence, however, was still possible, and it was systematised in Denmark by The Committee for Jewish Agricultural Apprentices.


After the Nazi rise to power in 1933, a voluntary federation of large German-Jewish organisations was formed. Among these was Hechaluz, a Zionist-socialist youth movement founded in Russia during the First World War. Its purpose was to provide young Jews with a theoretical and practical education in the areas of agriculture, gardening and craftsmanship. These skills were seen as essential for cultivating the land of Palestine.

Denmark was suited to this purpose due to its large amount of agricultural land, and a committee was founded by a number of leaders from the Danish Jewish community to help young Jews get into the country to obtain an agricultural education. This was only possible with Danish temporary residence permits and British certificates allowing future immigration to Palestine.

Deported to Theresienstadt

Approximately 1,500 young German Jews came to Denmark from Germany in the 1930s, and many of them went on to Palestine. About 300 Jewish children between the ages of fourteen and sixteen also made it to Denmark in 1939 through a help programme managed by Hechaluz, but the Second World War and the German occupation of Denmark put an end to all plans to travel on to Palestine. The young German Jews were difficult to reach with warnings in October 1943, but many of them were still able to escape to Sweden. However, several of them were arrested and deported with the Danish Jews to Theresienstadt.

Space and spaciousness

- an exhibition about Jews in Denmark

The exhibition is a broad story of Jewish life in Denmark and focuses on co-exixstence and indentity through 400 years. Read more...

Openings hours

Summer (June-August):
Tuesday to Sunday: 10 am - 5 pm
Monday closed

Winter (September - May):
Tuesday-Friday: 1 pm - 4 pm
Saturday and Sunday: 12 noon - 5 pm
Monday closed