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(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).
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(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).
(The Danish Jewish Museum).

Other promised lands

For a majority of Danish Jews, Denmark is where they belong - this is where their ancestors ended up. However, in the early twentieth century there was a lively discussion among most European Jews concerning adherence.


The Zionists pointed at Palestine as the only place where Jews could live a full and free life. The Jewish Socialist Parties agreed that Jews were an individual people with their own language and culture. However, they maintained that this culture existed in the Diaspora. Though the question was never important to Danish Jews, the effect of the Eastern European and International debate should not be underestimated.

Israel, London, New York...

Since the creation of the State of Israel in 1948, there have been many and close ties between Israel and Danish Jews. Although a number of Danish Jews are active in the Zionist Movement that supports emigration to Israel, many of the ties are personal. Many Danish Jews have family in Israel or have studied there, or have been on a Kibbutz trip.

The desire to emigrate is most manifest among young orthodox Jews, who view Israel as the place where they are most likely to find an orthodox spouse and live a religious life. Major cities such as London and New York with their large Jewish communities, their promise of culture, religious diversity and dynamism also have their attractions - especially for "cultural Jews". And yet most remain in Denmark with their dreams...

Patriotism

Both Georg Brandes and Henri Nathansson participated in the debate of the times on Jewish belonging. In January 1918, Georg Brandes wrote to Nathansson: "Are you too, to be numbered among the Jewish patriots? As your friend, the idea fills me with unease." Georg Brandes soon had a change of mind.

Space and spaciousness

- an exhibition about Jews in Denmark

The exhibition is a broad story of Jewish life in Denmark and focuses on co-exixstence and indentity through 400 years. Read more...

Openings hours

Special opening hours
31. oktober 2013 - 31. maj 2014

Tuesday to Friday: 12 noon - 5 pm
Saturday and Sunday: 10 am - 5 pm
Monday closed